[GUEST POST] On I walk: An autistic story of exercise addiction

Written by Ginny Grant It’s COVID isolation mark one. We’re allowed out for exercise each day but my brain – needing something certain to latch onto in these uncertain times – heard ‘We … I must exercise each day’. And so I walk the streets of my inner-city neighbourhood. Along noisy secondary roads, past theContinue reading “[GUEST POST] On I walk: An autistic story of exercise addiction”

Keep choosing recovery: the things that motivate me to stay sober as an autistic addict

Recovery from addiction is complicated. It challenges those of us experiencing it every day. Even now, approaching five years of sobriety, I fight a daily battle with a mind that seeks self-destruction. My mind tells me that I miss drinking and taking drugs. It turns my memories into a sort of twisted nostalgia, blotting outContinue reading “Keep choosing recovery: the things that motivate me to stay sober as an autistic addict”

The cost of autistic masking

Many of us, as Autistics, are well versed in masking. For so many of us, it is an involuntary reflex that happens without thought. What is masking? Masking, simply put, is the practice of disguising your autistic traits in order to pass as neurotypical. It is a survival mechanism in a world that actively oppressesContinue reading “The cost of autistic masking”

We need to talk about cigarettes, nicotine, and being autistic

Nicotine addiction is rarely talked about when discussing addiction, but it is probably the most common addiction around. I would estimate that at least half, if not most, of the autistic people I have interacted with have been smokers at some point in their lives. Nicotine addiction is a real issue, especially when you considerContinue reading “We need to talk about cigarettes, nicotine, and being autistic”

An open letter to autistic addicts

My fellow autistic addicts, As we approach the end of a historically difficult year, I hope that you can look back and be proud that you have survived. This year has brought many tests, and you have passed. If all you did this year was make it through, I want you to know that wasContinue reading “An open letter to autistic addicts”

A reflection on the distance I have travelled as an autistic addict

I can’t really remember the exact date upon which the shit hit the fan for me. I know it was towards the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014. My engagement broke up in spectacular fashion and I dissolved into my addiction like salt in hot water. There was nothing of the real meContinue reading “A reflection on the distance I have travelled as an autistic addict”

I am autistic, I am an addict, I am mentally ill

As self-advocates, we are often met with suggestions of how we should discuss ourselves. It’s deeply frustrating because it suggests that we have forgotten our own humanity, but unsurprisingly, we do not need to be reminded that we are people. You will hear me use identity First language a lot. This is not because IContinue reading “I am autistic, I am an addict, I am mentally ill”

Limits of the traditional twelve-step program for autistic folk

Anyone who is even vaguely familiar with the addiction recovery community will likely have come across the twelve-step program in one form or another. Alcoholics anonymous, cocaine anonymous, narcotics anonymous, the list goes on. There are many different groups employing the twelve-steps, and it is often what addiction treatment services suggest to service users toContinue reading “Limits of the traditional twelve-step program for autistic folk”

Finding sobriety: The seemingly insurmountable challenge

Many people ask me how I found sobriety, what changed in me to trigger that growth. I honestly think that might be the wrong question, not to mention awfully difficult to answer for most people in my position. The question that I think needs to be asked, is why didn’t I find sobriety sooner? WhatContinue reading “Finding sobriety: The seemingly insurmountable challenge”

OPINION: Stop referring to sober addicts as “clean”

Growing up alongside an addict I had heard the phrase “clean and sober” thrown about by many people (interestingly, not my family). When I became an addict myself, I quickly learned of the stigma surrounding drug and alcohol addiction, even at a time when I did not recognise addiction in myself. Skip forward to OctoberContinue reading “OPINION: Stop referring to sober addicts as “clean””