Parallels: My autistic identity and my asexual identity

I only recently publicly admitted to being asexual. It was a great weight off of my shoulders, although I don’t believe that it was too surprising to anyone who knows me well. Much like my being autistic, it was just part and parcel of who people already knew me to be. There is a distinctContinue reading “Parallels: My autistic identity and my asexual identity”

The impact of no healthy autistic asexual representation

I recently realised that I am on the asexual spectrum. More specifically I am greysexual. This means that I rarely feel sexual attraction, and can go a long time without sex with no issues. Most recently, I went through an 8 year stint of feeling no sexual attraction, and engaging in no sexual activity. PriorContinue reading “The impact of no healthy autistic asexual representation”

Simple acts of Radical Kindness: Maintaining my own wellbeing

As those who have followed my writing will know, I have a number of complex mental health issues as well as being an autistic addict in recovery. I am coping with the fallout of those mental health issues more often than not. For this reason, I have had to develop a toolbox full of copingContinue reading “Simple acts of Radical Kindness: Maintaining my own wellbeing”

UK: We owe our NHS a debt of gratitude that I fear we can never repay

I’m taking a brief break from the regular autism, addiction, and mental health topics to write about something that I think is extremely important here in my country. I’ve just finished watching the BBC workplace drama Casualty. Casualty is set in Holby City hospital’s emergency department, and rarely avoids the difficult conversations. This week, theContinue reading “UK: We owe our NHS a debt of gratitude that I fear we can never repay”

Keep choosing recovery: the things that motivate me to stay sober as an autistic addict

Recovery from addiction is complicated. It challenges those of us experiencing it every day. Even now, approaching five years of sobriety, I fight a daily battle with a mind that seeks self-destruction. My mind tells me that I miss drinking and taking drugs. It turns my memories into a sort of twisted nostalgia, blotting outContinue reading “Keep choosing recovery: the things that motivate me to stay sober as an autistic addict”

Surviving and recovering from the holidays and avoiding autistic burnout

Out of the last 48 hours, I have just spent 22 of those hours preparing and cooking Christmas dinner to be delivered to 30 vulnerable people in my home city. I do this every year, and it takes everything I have to do it. Whatever your traditions for this time of year, there is oneContinue reading “Surviving and recovering from the holidays and avoiding autistic burnout”

Men, it’s okay to cry: my autistic perspective

Tonight I watched “A street cat named Bob”. The film is adapted from a book, which is the true story of a heroin addict overcoming homelessness and addiction thanks (in part) to his friendship with a stray cat that he rescued. The film is very moving and relatable for me as an addict, and IContinue reading “Men, it’s okay to cry: my autistic perspective”

We need to talk about cigarettes, nicotine, and being autistic

Nicotine addiction is rarely talked about when discussing addiction, but it is probably the most common addiction around. I would estimate that at least half, if not most, of the autistic people I have interacted with have been smokers at some point in their lives. Nicotine addiction is a real issue, especially when you considerContinue reading “We need to talk about cigarettes, nicotine, and being autistic”

An open letter to autistic addicts

My fellow autistic addicts, As we approach the end of a historically difficult year, I hope that you can look back and be proud that you have survived. This year has brought many tests, and you have passed. If all you did this year was make it through, I want you to know that wasContinue reading “An open letter to autistic addicts”

2020: Reflecting on the year from my autistic perspective

Perhaps I am a little early on this, after all, we still have around 6 weeks left of this year, but it felt right at this point to reflect on the year from my autistic viewpoint. December 31st 2019, I had my usual gathering with my friends, but this time I didn’t make my usualContinue reading “2020: Reflecting on the year from my autistic perspective”