Neuronormativity, the pathologisation of Mental health, and the normalising of suffering

In recent years mental health has become more widely talked about, thanks to the popularisation of the “it’s okay not to be okay” trope. On the surface this is a wonderful approach to the normalisation of Mental health issues, but does it have a darker side? There are currently over 300 “disorders” listed in theContinue reading “Neuronormativity, the pathologisation of Mental health, and the normalising of suffering”

The tin can conundrum: the problem with “labels”

What is the tin can conundrum? If autism isn’t a label, what is it? is diagnosis necessary? this article aims to answer these questions, and considers the nature of our current system and the structural oppression of neurodivergent people.

Neuroqueer: Depathologising psychiatric “conditions”

A consideration on how neuroqueer theory can be used to depathologise the field of psychiatry and psychiatric conditions.

Neuroqueer: An introduction to theory

This article was Co-Authored by David Gray-Hammond, Katie Munday, and Tanya Adkin The emergence and popularisation of Neuroqueer theory in the contemporary disability rights discourse and Autistic rights movement represents a significant step forward. Not only does it encourage pride in ones true self, but it emancipates the Neurologically Queer from the normative attitudes thatContinue reading “Neuroqueer: An introduction to theory”

Mental health and the neurodiversity paradigm

When considering the landscape of mental health, we also have to consider the normalisation of stigma and the dehumanisation of those who are struggling. Since the advent of psychiatric medicine, mental health concerns have been described in pathological language. What if we used the language of the neurodiversity paradigm? How would it impact the wellbeingContinue reading “Mental health and the neurodiversity paradigm”

Neuroqueering the Neuroculture: Exploring our place in society through the neuroqueer lense

Recently I started talking about a concept I call neuroculture, by discussing the risk of harm to society if the prevailing neuroculture becomes homogenous (find that discussion here). In this discussion, I would like to explore our individual contributions to said neuroculture, and how we can effect change in a neurotypical dominated culture. It’s noContinue reading “Neuroqueering the Neuroculture: Exploring our place in society through the neuroqueer lense”

Radical Advocacy: Being an advocate in a hate filled world

Recently I have found myself considering the direction that my advocacy is taking. I have found myself reading extensively on “autism theory” and, on the other hand, writings by actually Autistic authors. At first I felt broken by what I had realised. Our world is built on a paradigm that by design oppresses anyone outsideContinue reading “Radical Advocacy: Being an advocate in a hate filled world”

Commentary on “Why requiring Autistic people to be diagnosed is a betrayal of the Neurodiversity movementWhy requiring Autistic people to be diagnosed is a betrayal of the Neurodiversity movement”

For this commentary to make sense, it may be worth reading my other recent articles on the liminal nature of the neurodiversity movement and the reality of Autopia. My recent articles have all come from my recent preoccupation with creating a utopian neurocosmopolitan society, and I have used my writing to try and imagine whatContinue reading “Commentary on “Why requiring Autistic people to be diagnosed is a betrayal of the Neurodiversity movementWhy requiring Autistic people to be diagnosed is a betrayal of the Neurodiversity movement””

Autopia: The reality of accommodating Autistics

At Aucademy we have long talked about our vision of a perfect Autistic utopia, affectionately called “Autopia”. The vision is of a collective living scenario, away from the pressures of a world that puts neuronormative standards and culturally accepted neurotypicality, ahead of any neurocognitive type that does not fit into its restrictive box. We oftenContinue reading “Autopia: The reality of accommodating Autistics”